Dali’s Dilemma – Manifesto for Futurism (1999)

DalisDilemma_Manifesto4.5 out of 5 Stars!

Dali’s Dilemma was a talented yet underappreciated and long-forgotten band from California that released only a single, highly enjoyable album before splitting.

After Dream Theater thankfully sliced a hole in the “grunge-obsessed” musical canvas of the ’90s, not only making a name for itself but also regenerating interest in the Prog genre, numerous new bands appeared shortly thereafter, showcasing a similar style of music yet with varying degrees of success. Several of my favorites of this “Revamped Prog” period included Aztec Jade, Lemur Voice, Cairo, Magellan, Shadow Gallery, Symphony X, Altura, Enchant, and Dali’s Dilemma, and each of these groups generated major excitement for legions of Prog fans (myself included) sick of the “grunge scene.”

Manifesto for Futurism is one album I played often, and still do for that matter, especially with the intricate song arrangements and often dazzling musicianship on these ten tracks, including standouts such as “Living in Fear,” “Miracles in Yesteryear,” “Ashen Days,” and “Within a Stare.”

Unfortunately, Dali’s Dilemma, like many other groups, got lost among the masses, especially when seemingly thousands of additional bands jumped on the Prog-bandwagon, but also (like Dali’s Dilemma) a ton of them happily left behind some savory, high-quality recordings such as Manifesto for Futurism, and New York’s acclaimed Magna Carta Records (who brought most of the aforementioned bands to the world’s attention—and sucked up much of my extra cash during the ’90s and into the new century, God love them) is one label that is sorely missed.

Get The Album Now!

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